A conservation plan for grizzly bears in Yukon

How do I participate?

Get thinking: Read the draft conservation plan for grizzly bears in Yukon.

Provide comments: Fill in the public engagement form from October 3 to December 3 that the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board is currently running.

  • Attend a community meeting:
    • Burwash Landing – November 5, 2018 at 6:00 p.m., Jacquot Hall, hosted by Kluane First Nation & Dän Keyi Renewable Resources Council (see poster for more info).
    • Tagish – November 8, 2018 at 6:00 p.m., Tagish Community Hall, hosted by Carcross-Tagish Renewable Resources Council (see poster for more info).
    • Whitehorse – November 22 – details to be confirmed.

Additionally, we will be conducting government-to-government consultations on the draft plan. 

What is this engagement about?

The Government of Yukon and the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board have developed a draft conservation plan for grizzly bears in the territory. The draft plan presents a 25-year vision for grizzly bears in Yukon, and outlines the conservation actions recommended to achieve this vision.

It is important to have a plan to conserve grizzly bears because they can be very slow to recover from population declines—grizzly bears are sensitive to human disturbance, and changes to their habitat. Across Canada, the health of grizzly populations varies, with some considered stable (as is the case in most of Yukon) and others declining or gone. In areas where conflicts between humans and bears are common, grizzly bear populations are more likely to decline.

We have developed this draft plan in partnership with the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board over the past 2.5 years.

How will my input make a difference?

The public comments received on the draft plan will help inform the final territory-wide grizzly bear conservation plan.

The results of the public survey on grizzly bears conducted in 2017 was part of the process for developing this draft plan. This survey was one source of information used to inform the development of the draft plan.

Where can I find related information?

On the Yukon Fish and Wildlife Management Board Draft Conservation Plan for Grizzly Bears in Yukon webpage.

The Yukon North Slope (a portion of the Inuvialuit Settlement Region) has an existing Co-management plan for grizzly bears on Yukon’s North Slope.

Results of the 2017 public survey about grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and their management in Yukon, Canada, technical report and summary.

Where can I find results?

We will share a summary of comments on the draft plan with you once we have collected input and consolidated the data.

Results at a glance

2017 public survey

We asked residents of Yukon and transboundary communities (such as Atlin and Aklavik) about their opinions on grizzly bears and their management in Yukon through a public survey in 2017.

Close to 1,400 people from Yukon and transboundary communities completed the survey.

Some key conclusions include:  

  • Almost all respondents agreed that grizzly bears are important to Yukon people and ecosystems, and that they value bears and the opportunity to see grizzly bears in the wild.
  • While some important differences were observed between groups of respondents (particularly bear hunters vs. non-bear hunters), overall there was a lot of agreement among groups in response to questions posed in the survey.

The survey provided information to the Yukon Grizzly Bear Conservation and Management Plan working group to help them develop the first-ever conservation plan for grizzly bears in Yukon.

Give your feedback on the engagement process

How did we do at this public engagement? Tell us by completing a short questionnaire.

Rate our public engagement process.

Last updated:
2018-11-08

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